Baghdad in the West: Migration and the Making of Medieval Jewish Traditions

By Marina Rustow

Association for Jewish Studies (AJS), Fall 2010

How did what we now call the Babylonian Talmud, a collection of scholastic texts studied in small disciple circles in tiny farming towns on the Euphrates, become the canonical text central to Jewish law from Jerusalem to Paris, Copenhagen to San'a, Brooklyn to Los Angeles? To the extent that the answer lies in the medieval period (and not in movable type, offset printing, mass literacy, or Diala- Daf), it has everything to do with migration from the Iraqi countryside--and, a bit later, with mass migration from Iraq itself.

Topic: History, Migration, Jewish Text, Publishing

Name of Publication: AJS Perspectives: The Magazine of the Association for Jewish Studies

Editor: Bunzl, Matti , Havrelock, Rachel

Volume/Issue: Fall 2010

Page Number(s): 11-13

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Genre: Article

Coverage: Iraq

Language: English

Copyright Holder: Publisher

Copyright Information: Download for personal use, freely distribute link

Bibliographic Information:
Rustow, Marina. Baghdad in the West: Migration and the Making of Medieval Jewish Traditions. AJS Perspectives: The Magazine of the Association for Jewish Studies. Association for Jewish Studies (AJS). Fall 2010: 11-13. http://www.bjpa.org/Publications/details.cfm?PublicationID=11994


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