Shave and a Haircut: Says Who? Getting to the Roots of an Unusual Restriction

By David Nelson

CLAL: the National Jewish Center for Learning and Leadership, 2000

In Judaism, there are a number of references and restrictions to the cutting of one's hair; the most notable examples are the prohibition on haircuts during the counting of the Omer, Samson's famous haircut, and the practice of not cutting a boy's hair until the age of three. The author analyzes, in particular, how ritually growing a boy's hair retains his sacredness, and compares that to how men who join the military or are imprisoned have their heads shaved. In conclusion, the author asks for the readers' own interpretations on the importance and meaning of hair in Judaism.

Topic: Halakha, History, Ritual, Jewish Law

Name of Publication: CLAL on Culture Archive

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Genre: Brief

Coverage: United States

Language: English

Copyright Information: Download for personal use, freely distribute link

Bibliographic Information:
Nelson, David. Shave and a Haircut: Says Who? Getting to the Roots of an Unusual Restriction. CLAL on Culture Archive. CLAL: the National Jewish Center for Learning and Leadership. 2000: http://www.bjpa.org/Publications/details.cfm?PublicationID=2518


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