"The Lonely Man of Faith": Implications for Social Work Practice

By Norman Linzer, Simcha Feurman, Katie Shaughnessy, Israel Fried

Jewish Communal Service Association of North America (JCSA), Spring 2008

Jewish Social Philosophy, the required course for all second-year students at Yeshiva University's Wurzweiler School of Social Work, is devoted to exploring various aspects of the human condition and, in the process, drawing implications for social work philosophy and practice. At its base is an article by Rabbi Joseph B. Soloveitchik, "The Lonely Man of Faith" (1965). Based on that article, the authors articulate the central theme, and follow it by four applications that deal with productivity and spirituality in the elderly, working with a depressed client, understanding the experience of loneliness in children, and working with cancer victims and their families.

Topic: Social Services, Post-Secondary Education, Higher Education, Religion, Values

Name of Publication: Journal of Jewish Communal Service

Editor: Linzer, Norman

Volume/Issue: vol.83/no.2-3

Page Number(s): 186-203

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Genre: Article

Coverage: New York, New York , United States

Language: English

Copyright Holder: Publisher

Copyright Information: Download for personal use, freely distribute link

Bibliographic Information:
Linzer, Norman. Feurman, Simcha. Shaughnessy, Katie. Fried, Israel. "The Lonely Man of Faith": Implications for Social Work Practice. Journal of Jewish Communal Service. Jewish Communal Service Association of North America (JCSA). Spring 2008: 186-203. http://www.bjpa.org/Publications/details.cfm?PublicationID=3736


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