The Challenge of the Middle Class - Casework Off the Beaten Path

By Ruth Fizdale

Jewish Communal Service Association of North America (JCSA), National Conference of Jewish Communal Service, Fall 1960

Social work agencies of the early 1960s did not operate with middle- and upper-class clients in mind. These agencies saw themselves as primarily serving those in economic need, and their open door policy provided a sliding scale of payment for service. The author argues that middle- and upper-class clients who can afford more than the highest end of a sliding scale can be better served in a private practice with fixed rates. Such private practices would not serve as training facilities (as do public agencies) and would therefore provide only the most experienced workers that middle- and upper-class clients prefer. The author concludes that establishing private practices for middle- and upper-class clients will alleviate traffic in public agencies, create a healthy environment for experienced social workers who do not wish to train others, and give the best service to every client who needs it.

Topic: Socioeconomic Status, Organizational Development, Social Services, Social Work

Name of Publication: Journal of Jewish Communal Service

Editor: Sherman, Sanford N.

Volume/Issue: Vol. 37/No. 1

Page Number(s): 103-111

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Genre: Conference Presentation

Coverage: United States

Language: English

Copyright Holder: Publisher

Copyright Information: Download for personal use, freely distribute link

Bibliographic Information:
Fizdale, Ruth. The Challenge of the Middle Class - Casework Off the Beaten Path. Journal of Jewish Communal Service. Jewish Communal Service Association of North America (JCSA),National Conference of Jewish Communal Service. Fall 1960: 103-111. http://www.bjpa.org/Publications/details.cfm?PublicationID=3981


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