Roadside Shrines, George W. Bush, and The Transformation of Church-State Relations

By Robert Rabinowitz

CLAL: the National Jewish Center for Learning and Leadership, 2000

The author explains that the divide in the United States between church and state is based on the Protestant premise that religion is a private matter. He discusses the alleged recent shift in the church/state boundary and people's allergic reaction to it. However, he contends that the current alarm stemming from the blurring of the church/state divide ignores the possibility that religion will actually be transformed by such a shift so that an increased public role for religion need not be oppressive. The author argues and concludes that the trend toward a more expressive form of religion shows the possibility of the emergence of popular forms of public religiosity that meet many of the needs formerly met by established religion and that obscure the denominational boundaries that have proved so divisive in the past.

Topic: Culture, Religion and State, Christianity, Religion, Government

Name of Publication: CLAL on Culture Archive

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Genre: Opinion

Coverage: United States

Language: English

Copyright Holder: Publisher

Copyright Information: Download for personal use, freely distribute link

Bibliographic Information:
Rabinowitz, Robert. Roadside Shrines, George W. Bush, and The Transformation of Church-State Relations. CLAL on Culture Archive. CLAL: the National Jewish Center for Learning and Leadership. 2000: http://www.bjpa.org/Publications/details.cfm?PublicationID=8285


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